The Music is On

In early summer 327 Alexander left Bactria with a reinforced army of 120,000 towards India.

Recrossing the Hindu-Kush, Alexander divided his forced into 2-hald going towards Khyber Pass while the rest being led by himself towards the hills in north.

In 326 BC he entered Taxila whose king supported him against his rival Porus.

The battle with Porus was his last great battler post which Porus also became his ally.

He was anxious to press on farther, and he had advanced to the Beas river when his army mutinied, refusing to go farther in the tropical rain; they were weary in body and spirit, and Coenus, one of Alexander’s four chief marshals, acted as their spokesman. On finding the army adamant, Alexander agreed to turn back.

Courage and aspiration were his poison.

His success and the meek surrender by his enemies made him arrogant leading him to believe that he was akin to God.

He was on a song and wanted to keep “dancing”

Courage and Arrogance are not a Plan

However as we have discovered in our lives courage and arrogance might help in creating self-belief, success depends upon several factors beyond personality characteristics.

Alexander’s arrogance was largely responsible for his own premature death; and he was personally culpable for the failure of his imperial enterprise. For Alexander was king of a society where the ruler was absolutely central to the well-being of society as a whole. When the king failed, the Macedonian kingdom imploded, something which had happened every generation for two centuries before him and happened again when he died. For the good of his people, Alexander needed an adult successor, but he refused to provide one while also killing any man who could be seen as one. The consequence was fifty years of warfare after his death and the destruction of his empire.

His confidence in himself and disdain for planning for the future destroyed a “Great Empire”.

What’s the Plan?

In Bull riding the rider gets on a large bull and attempts to stay mounted as the bull attempts to buck off the rider.

In the American tradition the rider must stay atop the bucking bull for eight seconds. Strapping yourself to 2000 pounds of ferocious, muscle throbbing, red-eyed bull takes guts. It wants nothing more than to buck you off and then stomp you into the ground. You have to balance your body with nothing more than one hand holding onto a bull rope wrapped around a heaving animal that’s out to get you. You have to be able to visualize the ride, the twists and turns. The mental ability is just as important as the physical ability when it comes to bull riding.

In addition, you have to know the proper technique for preparing yourself in the chute. You have to get on the bull, maintain balance, and be ready to anticipate that first move by the bull as it explodes from the gate. What’s more important, you need to know how to get off. The last thing a rider wants to do is get hung up and not be able to free their hand from the bull rope. When this happens the results can be disastrous.

So you see riding a bull might last only 8 seconds, the preparation can take a life time.

Nifty at “Record highs”

Every day news channels and papers shout their lungs out as Nifty touches record highs.

Investors indeed are riding the bull.

However are you prepared for the fall?

Ask yourself these questions:

  1. Do I know what I am doing?
  2. Why and what am I investing for?
  3. How much do I understand about what I am investing in?
  4. What are the risks associated with a particular investment?
  5. How much loss can I take?
  6. How would I feel if market drops 20-30% in a matter of days?

Prepare for the Journey

All long run charts of stock markets look similar-one way up.

However there are troughs and the investor needs to ride them to.

It is important to prepare yourself for the Journey.

Either develop an understanding or have an advisor/coach who can be your sounding board.

The cost associated with spending your own time or purchasing someone’s else time will be more than worth it if it helps you ride the bull

Do follow my twitter handle @manver1974 for more such shares

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s